The WHO of Leadership

An Unexpected Way to Become More Trustworthy

An Unexpected Way to Become More Trustworthy

This past week I had the privilege of addressing the top 100 leaders of one of my clients. It is a publicly traded company with operations on multiple continents and over 12,000 employees. It has, like many companies of its scope, plenty of opportunity to wrestle with complexity through its logistics, variety of businesses, and cultural diversity. Over the last 3+ years, the company has experienced an 89% gain in its share price.

The Questions Great Leaders Ask

The Questions Great Leaders Ask

Let’s be frank: being wrong is hard. I’ve never met a leader (or person, for that matter) who doesn’t struggle, at least a little bit, with being wrong. Being wrong attacks our egos. Being wrong feeds our insecurities. For those who believe that their value as a person is 100% tied to their ability to achieve, being wrong is a catastrophic event.